BIBLIOGRAPHY for FLORENTINE BAROQUE ART

MILES CHAPPELL

COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY


LAST UPDATED 16 DECEMBER 2009 

 

The BIBLIOGRAPHY for FLORENTINE BAROQUE ART is intended as an aid for the study of the art of this period in the light of its modern reappraisal.  The Bibliography will be updated periodically.   The listing was first published in the author's essay "Renascence of the Florentine Baroque," Dialoghi di  Storia dell'Arte, 7, 1998, pp. 56-111.  The exemplary bibliography in Rudolf Wittkower's Art and Architecture in Italy 1600-1750 (1958)  has been the model here.

Organized under topical headings, the present Bibliography indicates primary sources, fundamental works with early references, and useful recent studies.   As seen in the table below entitled "TOPICS," the Bibliography is organized by broad headings (sections with Roman numerals) and subheadings (the sections indicated by letters).  The topic headings and subheadings are links to sections in the Bibliography. 

Comments and suggestions for additions will be much appreciated and may be sent to the author at mlchap@wm.edu  or at M. Chappell, Department of Art and Art History,  College of William and Mary, P.O. Box 8795, Williamsburg, Virginia, USA 23187 - 8795. 


 


 

NOTE : The tabs on  the bar above correspond to the Roman numeral topic headings in the following outline.
 
 
 

TOPICS.

I. SOURCES.

A. Lives of Artists.

B. Letters and Documents.

II. GENERAL STUDIES.

A. Interpretations of Florentine Baroque Art.

B. Historical and Cultural Contexts.

C. Science and Art.

D. Art, Training, Theory and Institutions.

E. Iconography.

III. THE ARTS.

A. Surveys and Treatments of the Combined Arts.

B. Painting.

C. Drawing. 

D. Printmaking.

E. Sculpture.

F. Architecture and Garden Design.

G. Ceremonial Decorations and Theatre.

H. Decorative Arts, Pietre Dure, Medals etc.

IV. PATRONAGE. 

A. General Studies.

B. The Church.

C. The Medici.

D. Other Patrons and Collectors in Tuscany.

E. Patronage and Collecting outside Italy.

F. Collecting in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.

V. CITIES AND REGIONS.
 

VI. ARTISTS.